Lab #4

Part 2

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that diabetes accounted for $2.6 billion in health care costs in 1969. Today’s number is an unbelievable $100 billion a year.

Part 3

I tend to sympathize with these portly fast-food patrons, though. Maybe that’s because I used to be one of them.

Part 4

I grew up as a typical mid-1980’s latchkey kid. My parents were split up, my dad off trying to rebuild his life, my mom working long hours to make the monthly bills. Lunch and dinner, for me, was a daily choice between McDonald’s, Taco Bell, Kentucky Fried Chicken or Pizza Hut.

Part 5

As with the tobacco industry, it may be only a matter of time before state governments begin to see a direct line between the $1 billion that McDonald’s and Burger King spend each year on advertising and their own swelling health care costs.

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Part 6 Logical Examples

According to the Overseas Security Advisory Council set up by the United States Bureau of Diplomatic Security, Malaysia, whose language Bahasa Malay is thought to be one of the simplest languages in the world, has a high crime rating. Meanwhile, they indicate Iceland, as having a very low crime rating. Icelandic is one of the most difficult languages in the world to learn because of its complexities in phonetics and grammar structures.

Part 8-9-10 Pathetic Use of Analogy and Abstract Concepts

What i felt at the Mihwangsa Temple every morning, surrounded by the guttural sounds of our Yebul is beautifully portrayed in the movie Lost in Translation. Bill Murray has to film a Suntory Whiskey commercial with an irate director. There are no subtitles in the scene, where we see the director becoming increasingly exasperated because his long, emotional, diatribe is condensed by the translator into a succinct “look at the camera.” Murray is helpless, as am I, trying to decipher the monks’ chanting using an translated English prayer book, knowing full well it can’t capture the nuances of the Korean language.

 

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